When flipping learning . . . how do yo teach/reinforce students to work at their own pace and take accountability for their learning?

Hi everyone!

I have loved all the conversation this week about flipped learning throughout our slow chat! Let’s continue today to think about how we can begin to teach and then further reinforce students to work at their own pace and take accountability for their learning.

So may of you have shared so far this week how a flipped classroom really frees you up as a teacher to help students more in small groups or individually, but how to we ensure as teachers that all students are learning and continuing to learn more independently? Can’t wait to hear your thoughts!

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@informed_members @Certified_Educators

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I used to use paper exit and entrance tickets to encourage accountability when flipping the learning. I also model how learning in this way depends on their interactions and efforts with the material (don’t just wait for the teacher to tell you what you need and then give that back and that’s how learning works). I usually start most conversations with’ what have you tried’ and go from there. Now I use Formative and I able to get more data and provide more timely feedback thus increasing the accountability and ability to work at pace. The time afforded to me has allowed me to increase my time with my students and focus on both areas of topics and differentiate learning. I really feel that our job as educators is to help students be responsible for their own learning.

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Some of the ways that I teach students to work at their own pace is first by discussing with students the results of their learning styles and then conversing with them ways that they learn best. Based on an individual students need is when I incorporate learning pathways, check lists, daily assessments, mastery checks and learning stations to name a few.

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I think you hit on something really big here - giving timely feedback! When you are showing students that you are looking over their work/tracking their progress, I think they are more likely to give their best!

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Great ways to hold students accountable and see how much they are learning throughout!

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I love this approach to learning conversations. I think that it not only encourages students to take accountability for their learning, but shows them that you are there to support them and help them get to that next learning step.

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I really like the idea of partnering with students to discover more about how they learn. I think that it allows students to see that you are personalizing their learning and sets the stage for positive relationships :slight_smile:

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The end of year survey I gave my students last year reflected that they wanted help with goals and organization. I am working on checklists to help them track their projects and progress. @rsanders I have done this in the past and am working on honing the process. I hope to more effectively use Formative @d.vendramin once my standards are updated. The district is doing training this week for standards based grading. They are having the core do Mastery Connect. I have used it in the past but it is just not effective for me since my standards are not there and I can’t get them there. I usually have students do a series of personal learning assessments to identify career paths, interests and learning styles. They become more aware of who they are and I can identify the types of learners in my room.

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Love that you polled your student to know where to shape and guide your instruction this way! I imagine that those ideas would come up across many classrooms as we try to foster independence and self-motivation to learn content.

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If I have students review a video and then redo the formative assessment after the flipped learning, I give them about a week. This way they can review in class and at home. I try to keep things parallel and moving so that reinforcement is coming in all possible directions. I think the ability to redo assessments gives them the incentive to take ownership of their own learning.

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It is still a work in progress for me as well. Always looking to better my process.

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Love that you give your students time to redo assessments!

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I just messaged you to follow up about this!

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Because I teach English Language Learners by default each works at his/her pace. I use resources that differentiate for the students. And example of this is Newsela where each student receives the current events article at his/her own reading level. The students are accountable for their own learning because they are responsible for completing requirements before they are able to take the assessment. They have to notify me when they are ready and have to justify their decision to me. Revisions of writing prompt and quizzes only occur if the students can show me what they have done to prepare for rewrites or retakes.

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Lisa that is a great point. I once was of the mind that having redos was punishing the students who studied the first time but my older and wiser self now sees the error of my younger days. :smile:

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So true! What matters is doing the right thing for the students and finally realizing it. I remember my younger self not realizing it either. I just thought, “It’s always been done that way.” We’ve come a long way! :slight_smile:

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When I taught computer science, there were students that needed to move at a faster pace than the majority of the class. Direct teaching one lesson per class was not doing it for them. So I created hyperdocs (playlists) of the lesson sequences for students to move along at their own pace. I anticipated where in the lesson I needed to include a checkpoint to assess that students understood the skill before moving on. To do this, I incorporated formatives for students to complete at certain points. I would then always have the formative open on my computer. Students would let me know they completed a formative, I would check comprehension and let them know to move on or if we needed to review a concept together. It was a big time saver and students appreciated not having to wait for the rest of the class to move on.

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