What are some quick ways to routinely assess students and gather meaningful data?

multi-disciplinary

#1

Yesterday, @mlschnick guest hosted our weekly #formativechat on Twitter and we heard so many great ideas for making formative assessment efficient! We’d love to once again continue the conversation in our community and invite you to reply with your thoughts on the question below!

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@informed_members @Certified_Educators


#2

Quick ways to routinely assess Ss are through:
* @Flipgrid
* @GoFormative
* @Quizziz
* @Kahoot
* @Commonlit
* @EdjiNotes
* Google Forms
* Silent Exchange
* Google Slides


#3

Thanks, Lisa, pretty much mirrors mine, except Edjinotes is new to me, so thanks for the idea.

Some other ideas:
Thinglink (make them develop their own Thinglinks)
Edpuzzle (Flipped at home): A key piece to my flipped classroom
Newslea, but I use it sparingly
Digital videos of lecture with questions placed in key spots, students have to write the answers using Cornell note-taking guide and then participate next day using the color of the day. I use a combination of Screencastify, Vidyard and other videocasting software and then post the links in Google Classroom with an assignment questions.
Wizer.me (worksheet capable)
PearDeck: Allows interactions with presentations, I often go over at the end of the day, those struggling students and reteach it if they don’t show mastery.
Mindomo, Mindmeister, Coogle = they have to do a mindmap on the subject, everyone has to help construct the mindmap. Then I place the finished product in Google Classroom, so they can review it at night. As homework, they must enter one question to discuss within their learning groups at the start of class. They continue to build the map for the entire learning week and on Friday, we have a showdown of the event, person or place. Groups continue to battle until we have two. Then the class votes after each provide their reasons why it is the most important issue they learned at the end of the week. Please note: If you are a teacher who does not like a ton of noise, this is not for you! The debates become as heated as Kahoot or other Gamification.
Padlet (where I do a 4-minute scramble, I group them by small learning groups, they place everything down that they have mastered and then have to place one question that they don’t know or understand), then after 4 minutes, they do a 3-minute discussion within their group). Each student then has to provide one piece of information to the entire class (if they pass, then they must come up with two answers). Everyone participates.
Mentimeter or Polleverywhere for polling. This is a nice app because I typically will App smash something and then post the link to a question. Everyone get to poll and its great for those shy students (I normally get a 100% on this activity as far as participation). Great for debates.

Not so quick but highly effective a project-based assessments.

Blabberize: Kids grab a photo of something off the web and then write a 2-minute presentation. Great for history, science, reading, and writing. I’ve even shown my kids to use it to describe a math problem (no I don’t teach math, but they make the mouth move over a number and explain the rationale for the solving the problem.

Inforgram.com. They make an infographic of a subject. Normally, I break this down as a PBL and have them develop one (Small group). Small groups allow a teacher to focus on the effort in class, the students work on it outside the classroom and like you don’t have to grade 200 Infographics. You can save the best ones and post them in a Google Museum and the next year’s classes get to see who contributed. I taught two siblings, one year separated from each other. The younger sister saw her older sisters work and she said: “I could do better”. She did and is a receives SPED support.


#4

These look like great tools to appsmash with Formative! Do you know if they offer an embed code? Creating a mind map could be a a great group activity at the appropriate point within a formative!

I checked this out and love how it allows you to create “talking” images! I see that they offer an embed code and could picture this being a fun way to deliver instructions within Formative!


#5

Use @goformative tools like Multiple Choice/Show Your Work, use mini-whiteboards, use thumbs up, side, or down are a few quick ways to gather data to make instructional decisions.


#6

If we are talking quick ways - I love Pear Deck - as I’m teaching I can stop and ask any type of question and see on my screen how my students are thinking - it keeps them on their toes!


#7

These look like great tools to appsmash with Formative! Do you know if they offer an embed code? Creating a mind map could be a a great group activity at the appropriate point within a formative! I checked this out and love how it allows you to create “talking” images! I see that they offer an embed code and could picture this being a fun way to deliver instructions within Formative!

Mindomo does have an embed code, it also offers a link to view, RSS and HTML link. I attached one of my Mindomo’s. I had a meeting with their community developer and she is giving me access to help develop it more for my students. Yes, let me play with this Mindomo activity and then later next week, do a Formative on it.

https://www.mindomo.com/mindmap/american-revolutionary-battles-67b6177976406a9d177153596ad79f96

Coogle: Yes it has an embed code. Here is one I am trying to finish up to address Texas Native Indians.

Let me get back to you on Mindmeister.

Pete


#8

Great ideas from both @pflynn and @fichtlis

I teach high school math, and just finished my 6th year of flipping those classes.

I would add Quizlet (and quizlet live) to this list. The collaboration that has to happen during quizlet lives is unbelievable and often times I find that the most quiet students come alive during this activity.

I am starting to use edpuzzle next year with my flipped classes. I used to use Crystal Kirch’s WSQs (Watch, Summarize, and Question) and then moved to embedding the videos into a formative and asking questions that way. However, I need something that I can monitor time spent on the video, prevent students from fast forwarding, and a way to assess knowledge as the video is presented.

I have never heard of @edjinotes and researched that after seeing it mentioned here. I passed along the site to the English coordinator at my high school.


#9

Edpuzzle has a great way to monitor student activity. You can check each student individually, check the amount of time a student works the assignment (really great for students who struggle or basically did not pay attention to the activity and selected the answer). You can run a report on student activity as well.

Another way is to embed your video either in a Wizer activity (note: work with your district IT staff to preapprove any Youtube or other personally created videos), as your students might not be able to watch it. Wizer reports give you the time a students spends working on the activity (note 2: It doesn’t monitor activity, just the period when the device/worksheet are connected. I had a student who spent 2 hours on the assignment (the worksheet was a 20 minute activity), so beware.


#10

My videos are already approved in youtube. Our district went to that 3 years ago. I have my videos on both youtube and google drive.

I am hoping Edpuzzle will do the trick.


#11

Shai,

I’ve placed the link to Edpuzzle Professional Development. I only placed the “beware” for users who experience some of my transitional issues.

Edpuzzle Professional Development Link


#12

Thank you, @pflynn! I will be sure to look at this site.