Rock Cycle Formative

I just created a formative to assess whether my student can tell what happens in the rock cycle. I uploaded a template to the background of a show your work question and ask students to a color-coded “x” to explain what happens at different stages (since I think I thought it would be a bit faster then having them write complete words). I’d love to hear what you guys think and any suggestions on how to make this better for my students and for me would be greatly appreciated! Here’s the link a copy of the formative: https://goformative.com/clone/YRFVWL

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As an English teacher, I think I gather what you are trying to do here. When I have students do something like this, I normally have them explain with a brief answer below their choices for labeling it the way they did. Not only does it show me if they truly get the connection between the process, but I can see if there are any misconceptions. Also, are they going to have to use more than one colored “x” on the chart? If so, you may want to indicate that in the formative itself. Afterwards, you may be able to give the students a scenario of how they could apply this knowledge to their world. When will this information be useful and applicable for them? Hope this helps and have a great day.

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Thanks for taking a look. I love the idea of letting students find their own way to label a process and justify it. If you have an example handy, I’d be interested in checking it out.

Also, yes, they are supposed to use the colored “x” that corresponds with the change happening for one thing to change into another (ex: since a metamorphic rock must undergo melting in order to become magma, they would fill in the purple box with a yellow “x” since that represents melting according to the table above the template.) It seems I’ve missed the mark with my directions here so I rephrased the directions that appear above the canvas and also tried to make it more obvious that the top part of the canvas is a color-coding key. Does this work better? I am going to be giving this formative on Friday and I appreciate you letting me know that the directions need tweaking.

Also, understanding the rock cycle is not something that most of my students will be able to apply to their real world, but helps build a foundation for later concepts that can become more tangible for them (ex: types of rocks present in different parts of the world provide clues to tectonic plate movement over time). You’ve motivated me to start looking into hands-on projects to get my students excited about the rock cycle and how they will be able to apply it! If there’s any educators out there with ideas on how to do this, I’d love to hear it!

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I like you idea for the proving they know the rock cycle. What do you think about using edpuzzle as a continuation of the quiz?

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Thanks Bruce! I haven’t used Edpuzzle much, but could see it working really well to help prime students for a lab. I appreciate the recommendation :wink:

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I like your idea. I had trouble working this out when I gave a similar Rock Cycle assessment! I’ll play with this too!

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Hi Jamie,

I really like your formative. I wonder if you could follow up the diagram labelling activity with some questions where students need to either identify the rock types of different sample rocks (e.g. pictures of sandstone, granite etc…)?

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I like this! It is very specific and asks the students to do more than just regurgitate the three things that happen. The level of detail you require is perfect. I would suggest maybe adding a picture of each kind of rock instead of just the name to give students another anchor to use as they try to remember what they’ve learned.

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I like your formative , I had the Rock Cycle lesson to teach months back .( We actually went on a rock walk .) Visuals made the terms so much easier for students to remember. Perhaps you can incorporate pictures of the concepts?

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