How to emulate "left-hand pages" in Formative for social sciences classes?

I have always really liked using “left-hand pages” in interactive students notebooks in my social sciences classes. For those unfamiliar with them, teacher input (graphic organizers, notes, etc.) go on the right-hand side of a notebook or binder, and then students occasionally create a left-hand page that processes the information from the right-hand page(s). They are supposed to demonstrate the higher levels of thinking (i.e., application, analysis, synthesis, and/or evaluation) in doing so.

I would love to be to use Formative to create digital left-hand pages, but I definitely need some help visually how to set this up as left-hand pages can take so many different forms–text, visuals, a combo of both. Has anyone does this?

Thanks!

  • Lindsay
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Hi, Lindsay!

What a great idea. Would something like this work? I have never used interactive notebooks, but this is what I imagined as I read your post.

Example interactive notebook page

Claire

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Yes! That’s what I was trying to imagine! Thanks so much :blush:

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Hi Lindsay and Claire,

I love this idea, as I use interactive notebooks a lot in math with my third graders. It’s always great to see the creative and unique ways that students come up with to show their thinking and understanding.

What Claire came up with as the example looks awesome because it offers the students three different options: essay, show work, and audio.

I was also thinking that you could make the “interactive notebook” more collaborative as a follow-up activity. A lot of times, we spend time sharing our left side with a collaborative partner in class, so what if you embedded a Padlet at the bottom of the Formative to allow the students to transfer their thinking to a tool that other students could access. This way they’re sharing with others, and learning from the ideas of their classmates.

Just a thought. Thanks for sharing ladies!

Brent

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Thanks, Brent! The “students sharing digital work with each other” issue has always been tricky for me. Although I know of Padlet, I’ve never explored it. I found out this morning that school is closed due to mudslides (I’m in Santa Barbara), so I’m going to learn Padlet today!

Lindsay

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Hi, Lindsay!

Will you post what you think of Padlet? I’m new to it too, and I’m also trying to wrap my head around digital collaboration.

I’m not sure it’s appropriate to say “Happy mudslide day,” but enjoy your day and stay safe.

Thanks!
Claire

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I love Vicki Davis’s blog, Cool Cat Teacher, and she has a post about Padlet. I read through it this morning, and it was super helpful!

In the past, my options for students to share work with one another was to either a) share it through Google Drive or b) create a student Weebly webpage and post items them (I tried Google Sites earlier this year, but it doesn’t support audio files!). The limitation with a) was that it was difficult to share with a large number of classmates. The limitation with b) was that it took time on the front end to set up the webpages.

Creating a Padlet where students can post their work (or a link to it) seems much faster and easier than my previous options. And like Brent said, it can be embedded into a Formative as a step for students to share their work with each other. A teacher could even post the names of the groups members that will be working together reviewing each other’s work that they can easily grab from the Padlet.

I just got Google Cardboards to use with my art history students, but I only have enough for half the class to use at a time. I suppose I could use a Formative with an embedded Padlet to keep the other half of the class engaged in a learning activity while I lead students on a Google Expedition using Google Cardboards. They can then switch.

I’ll try that out and post how it goes.

Lindsay

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Thanks, that’s helpful!
So students can post their work on padlet from within a Formative, right? Does anyone know if a) it’s possible to set up/embed a blank padlet to fill for each student, and b) if we would be able to see their work by looking at their Formatives? @david, can you help?

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I was searching for a way to embed a padlet into a formative, but then I saw you had already done this. I’d love to see an example of this since I’ve had some trouble with it.

Regarding this, I thought that all padlets were blank until students shared their thoughts on it. Is that what you are trying to do or are you looking for something else? Admittingly, I am pretty new to Padlet!

Lastly, while there is no actual integration between Padlet and Formative, I think you could simply navigate to the “Edit” page of the formative and scroll to the Padlet to see the Padlet responses.

Fantastic! Let me know what you think. Today was our first day back, following abnormally large amounts of snow (in NC here), and I used it as part of a digital break-out. The kids love it!

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