GoFormative in EFL / ESL

Hi,

Is there anybody using GoFormative in English as a Foreign Language or English as a Second Language?

I am using it to create grammar drill formatives for my students, which are usually multiple choice or short answer questions. Is there anybody else using it for similar purposes? Any practises that you recommend?

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Hey Omer! Here is a grammar drill I use for reviewing prepositions with my middle school ESL students. It’s really nothing fancy, but I do like to start my grammar drill formatives with a video to review the concept the students are working on within the formative. I learned to add directions and a word bank using text block from a colleague of mine too. Let me know what you think. :slight_smile:

Prepositions Part 1
Clone Code: AFBGAW
https://goformative.com/clone/AFBGAW

Dean

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@DeanW Is there a part 2?

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Hi there,

I’m an EFL teacher and I 'm planning to use Formative to asses my students learning especially in grammar. I did that with Kahoot and it was amazing. Students learn while playing. This time I will try Formative. I will share the experience with you guys.

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I don’t teach specifically to ESL students, but I have used Formative specifically with differentiation in mind. Because of this, our head ESL teacher tries to place her students in my classes whenever possible. I break down each learning target into several mini-lessons that provide ‘steps’ to progress towards the level of mathematics they will see on my test. I use videos and the Formative whiteboards to add color to the steps in my examples prior to independent practice. This summer, I’ve been inspired to add audio links that my ESL students/low readers can cilck and listen to the directions as they follow the text. I also plan to ‘hide’ some pictures/hyperlinked text so my ESL and IEP students can have an adapted version of the assignment (with simpler directions, fewer multiple choice options, less questions, etc.)

I totally agree! I found a math site that my ESL students LOVE! It’s called ProdigyGame.com. Students play through a story and ‘battle’ animals and other players along the way. The battle is a set of math problems, which if answered correctly, serve as ‘hits’ towards the other character’s HP or a ‘block’ to keep a student from losing his own HP. Students level up, collect special attacks/blocks, and collect animals along the way. My favorite part is the students can battle each other in class AND each student is working at their own math level. All my students play, but my ESL students love the game because there is an audio button they can click on and it reads the directions to them. This is especially helpful for my Marshallese students because they typically come to me with ZERO reading skills. Many of my students have strengthened their English by playing Prodigy Game.

ProdigyGame starts out with a set of diagnostic problems that tell you a student’s independent learning level for the game. It then progresses the student through the math levels as they show proficiency. There are ‘help’ buttons students can click on to get a hint or to see a similar problem worked out. I can interject a specific set of problems (for the whole class or for individual students) into their computerized learning plan and then review those reports and use the data to plan your next steps.

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I do not have a class dedicated to ESL students, but I do have them in all classes throughout the day. I find that when introducing a new concept with my students, it is good to “pre teach” them with vocabulary and videos in their native language. Attaching these with some follow up questions would be a great way to help reach those students.

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Yes, I completely agree. I often times gave my ELL kids a heads up, and tried to provide a video in their language with the concepts needing to be pretaught.

Also, I had the luxury of having ALL of my ELL students have study hall at the end of the day with the ELL teacher, so, I assigned a student TA (who spoke the language) to that study hall to be able to help preteach students in their native language. I know that is difficult to do for every language, as my district has 161 countries represented at the high school, but I can often find a student that can help. I am also free the last period of each day (Block A and Block B) so I also will pop in and help the students prior to a lesson. This really helps them during the lesson activities the next day.

I flip all of my math lessons, and am exploring ways to translate my videos.

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I’m very interested in this. Could you tell me/us more about it, please?

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I wish I could at this time, but haven’t found anything that allows me to translate my own videos. If I find anything, I will be certain to share. If you know of anything, please let me know too.

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@michael.lutz

So, if the video is on YouTube here are some steps that incorporate “Google Translate” within YouTube to caption a video! :slight_smile:

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Here is my Italian Formative on Present Progressive. Just so you see the format, and maybe you can do a similar one in English for your ESL students? Just a thought:)
DLPNOM
or
link
https://goformative.com/clone/DLPNOM

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