#FormativeSummit Challenge: Day 8, Starr Sackstein!

Hey #FormativeSummit attendees :formative:

Now that you’ve watched Starr’s inspiring session, we are curious to hear your thoughts about the prompt below. How can you create memorable learning experiences for your students? What are things you’ve tried and what are things you’d like to try?

Shout-out to @lpereira for continuing to help facilitate this discussion!

Notes:

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I give my students memorable learning experiences by giving them voice and choice consistently. I allow them to make many choices with their daily work agendas. For example, their is always some type of formative assessment assigned, however students may choose the resources they want to use such as a Quizziz or a Kahoot!. This way students have a little flexibility and options on how they want to move through the learning content.

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I think memorable learning experiences have underlying characteristics: students are experimenting with the material, students have choice, students feel that the material is connected to their reality, and lastly it is an image rich lesson. My approach is based on Tim Elmore’s book about Gen Z and how we educate them.

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Honoring both student voice and choice is such an important part of making learning memorable for students! It’s great that you are doing this on daily basis as they gauge their progress!

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Students in my room work on Penpal Schools, which provides students choice in creating a final submission of what they learned in the project. Students also are given multiple tools to use to gain knowledge and process through the lessons, topics, and standards at their comprehension of each. Students are asked their opinions, questions and comments at the end of each lessons, which I think helps them make the memory of a positive experience.

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One thing I did recently was to alter their personal narrative writing assignment. After writing a rough draft and revising it, the students took their narrative and turned it into a storyboard/comic strip. Then they used the app, Toontastic, to turn their storyboard into an animated cartoon with dialogue and narration. The students loved it and worked harder on the Toontastic than they would have on writing a final copy essay.

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I want to use more formative assessments that my students remember later. Many have come back to me later and said “Hey Miss Stroud I loved it when we did” this. It’s something they created on their own to show me evidence of their learning. It was a medium of their choice and provided great feedback for me as a teacher.

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Did anyone else’s audio cut out towards the end?

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Have you tried any of the great features in formative like show your work, embedding video, have questions embedded on top of an image, maybe audio response if you have premium? My students enjoy these options.

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I bet they loved watching each others cartoons. Did they comment on each others toons or give peerr feedback? I find students remember the feedback that their peers give.

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I am not familiar with Penpal schools. I can’t wait to check it out!!! Love formative as part of my PLN, learning each day.

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Do you mean the very end of the video? Sorry about the abrupt stop. We edited it out since I was a little redundant after that part lol. We didn’t share any additional, new info.

Starr tries to give students (and members of her PLN) ownership. I feel that is key for learning. Whenever possible, I try to gather ideas and feedback from the students. Math is a little more rigid in the way things are laid out (especially the higher you get), so allowing for students to help decide how we learn and the activities we do is essential for student ownership and buy-in to the content being taught.

Watching students lead other students is one of my favorite parts of teaching. Just this week I was walking around the room checking on my groups. One student asked me a question and another student in the group said, “I was teaching her how to do this Mrs. Mintner. You can go now.” I threw my hands up in surrender and walked away (with a huge smile on my face.) Later, he called me back over because she didn’t understand what he was trying to tell her. The three of us had an amazing conversation about how teaching is hard because students have different learning styles. I pointed out that I knew that she was a visual learner so I used a way to show all the factors she needed to factor her polynomial. He said he didn’t try that method because I hadn’t taught him that way. I reassured him that it was okay. I taught him the way I knew he learned. Of course, he shooed me away again, now that he knew how to explain things in ‘her way.’

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